How Tattly gets things done

In 2011, Tina Roth Eisenberg decided to stop getting annoyed by the ugly temporary tattoos her daughter loved and take matters into her own hands.

Tattly make fake tattoos designed by real artists. Tattly’s artists include lettering genius Jen Mussari, picture book aficionado Oliver Jeffers, doodler Jon Burgerman, and stationary dream Rifle Paper Co.

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You can make custom temporary tattoos with Tattly, perfect for a conference, wedding, or even your son’s 7th birthday. One of our favorite custom creation is this sheet of the Tattly team’s faces to celebrate April Fool’s Day.

We chatted with Elisabeth Morgan, Tattly’s Social Media and Marketing Manager, about inspiration, Tattly’s process, and how they use Dropmark to get things done.

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How do you work with real artists to create fake tattoos?

Our founder, Tina and our creative team keep an eye out for new artists all the time on social media and out and about in the world. We license their artwork and make it into high-quality temporary tattoos made in the US, and the artists get a generous cut of every sale. Last year we passed the $1million mark in royalties!

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How does design fit into Tattly’s culture?

We believe good design makes people happy. Most of our team comes from a design or artistic background, and design is central to everything we create. We want everything to be delightful.

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Tattly’s are sold in over 40 countries(!) – how does Brooklyn inspire your team?

Most obviously, it’s the number of artists and designers living so close that are an inspiration to our team and our collections. On a more subtle level, we’re always inspired by the level of activism and community participation that surrounds us.

We love when people come by our headquarters to pick up Tattly that they’re going to wear for a parade for Pride or the Women’s March. And it’s been an honor to be a part of some very quintessentially New York events: we’ve brought Tattly to everything from Time Out’s Battle of the Burger to Christie’s Old Masters Week.

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How does Dropmark fit into your workflow?

As a social media manager, I often use Dropmark to save posts that have particularly resonated with our audience. It’s great to be able to see all the popular ones together so we can see if any patterns show up, like color palettes or specific designs.

I also use it to share stats with my team, who are super visual learners. Instead of handing them a spreadsheet of engagement rates, reach, and impressions, I’ll Dropmark the posts that I’m analyzing them and organize them into boards in a particular order to communicate their effectiveness. I like to link back to the original social post, so it’s easy for everyone to click into whatever platform it comes from to get more context into what else we were sharing that week.

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What’s the most interesting thing you’ve Dropmarked lately?

We recently Dropmarked submissions for a collaboration we’re doing with Society6! We asked some of their artists to create custom temporary “Flash Sheets” for us that we’re going to make into Tattly. We had a TON of original submissions flow in that were so fun to sort through. We Dropmarked our final choices to see how they would come together as a collection.

See more about Tattly at tattly.com and follow them on Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, and Facebook.

Three ways you can use Dropmark with clients

Working with clients on Dropmark can streamline your process, so you can stop playing email ping pong or renaming files ‘final_finalist_final_ever’.

We’ve made it easy to use Dropmark with clients. In fact, there are three different ways that you can use Dropmark to optimize your workflow with clients.

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One: Add clients as collaborators

You can add a collaborator to any of your Dropmark collections for free.

Collaborators will have all the same privileges as the owner of the collection. This means that collaborators can view the collection and add new items. If a Pro user owns the collection, all collaborators can use Dropmark’s Pro features. This way collaborators can add comments, stacks, and new items.

Comments can make getting feedback back quick and straightforward. Also, you can also use annotations to dig into the detail of what is and what isn’t working.

You can annotate images on Dropmark & speed up getting feedback from clients.
To add a collaborator open up the collection’s settings. You can do this by clicking on the gear icon in the top right corner. Click on the ‘Collaborators’ tab to manage existing collaborators or invite new people to collaborate. To invite a new collaborator type in their email address and Dropmark will then send them an invitation to view the collection.


To add comments and new items to the collection your client will need to create a Dropmark account. Don’t fear; they can stick to our free Lite accounts and still access Pro features on collections that are owned by a Dropmark Pro or Team.

Collaborators have full access to all the collection’s items. This means they can add new items, and they also have the ability to delete items. You might want to consider this before adding collaborators your collections.

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If you’re not quite ready to give your client the reigns, you can always send them a link to view the collection. This means that they can see the collection, but not make any edits.

Using read-only links can be a great way to share information with a select group of people, or send mood boards that clients can explore at their own pace.

By default all Dropmark collections are private. If you want to share a link with a client, you need to change your privacy settings. Start by opening the collection’s settings by clicking on the gear icon in the top right corner. Select ‘anyone with link’ to allow individuals with the direct link to see the collection.


Now you can send the link to your client. You can copy the URL from your browser, or you can click over to the ‘Advanced’ tab in your collection’s settings for a cleaner short link.

Three: Make a Dropmark Team

A Dropmark Team gives you private space to collaborate online. Dropmark Teams are ideal for working with a group of people over an extended period. You can add the whole team to a collection with one click, or collaborate with different segments of the group on each collection.

Dropmark Teams make big projects easier to manage because you can focus on individual elements in separate collections. For example, you could have a collection for social media, another for design updates, and another for future plans. See more about Dropmark teams.

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Dropmark is flexible, clean, and intuitive to use, so clients pick it up effortlessly. Collaboration is at the core of what we do. Every project is different, and every client is different, so we’ve made it easy to collaborate with clients on Dropmark.

How do you use Dropmark with your clients? Let us know on Twitter and Instagram.

How Proof gets things done

Proof is a team of thinkers, designers, developers, and strategists based in Nashville, Tennessee.

Founded in 2010, Proof’s drive is to craft purposeful and passionate brands. They make creating and overhauling brands look easy, when it’s really some of the most challenging work designers can undertake.

We chatted with Matt Cheuvront, Proof’s Founder and CEO, about inspiration, Proof’s process, and how they use Dropmark to get things done.

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Tell us a little about Proof Branding, how did y’all get started?

I opened up the doors at Proof in 2010, shortly after the recession in ‘08. From the beginning, our focus has always been to approach the creative process comprehensively. We believe that any strong brand is greater than the sum of its parts, and is consistent in its delivery, both in how it communicates and aesthetically, across the board.

In the past 9 years, we’ve worked on developing the brand for hundreds of clients, from breweries to Fortune 500s, commercial properties to schools and nonprofits. We love the diversity of the work we do, and it keeps us motivated day to day.

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How does being in Nashville impact your work?

Nashville is a rapidly going, thriving community (and also happens to be my hometown). We’re actively involved with the local creative community, and about 50% of our overall work is here in town, with the rest of our clients in other parts of the country.

Nashville’s design community is collaborative and supportive - there’s very little animosity or direct competition with other firms in town. Everybody “plays nice” and we all understand that there is plenty of work to be had for all of us.

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How does design fit into your Proof’s culture?

Design is at the core of what we do, but most important to us is that the “what” has a clearly defined “why”. Defining the depth of meaning in what we do and what we create differentiates us as a branding firm from your traditional design shop.

Culture is essential being a smaller, more boutique agency, and we’re very transparent with our company’s culture, process, and systems. You can read more about who we are, what we do, how we do it, and why we do it, in our Playbook.

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What inspires your team?

We’re inspired by the world around us, and each other. We play off each other’s strengths, and our creative process is highly collaborative. The entire team participates in design reviews, and everyone has a voice (whether you’re a designer or not).

We’re always focused on being leaders, not followers, from a creative standpoint. We push our clients to think less about what everyone else is doing, and more about what they can be doing best.

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What does your team’s creative process look like?

Our creative process is outlined in detail in our Playbook. While it may not seem entirely unique, we are consistent in going through a regular process, especially in the early stages of a project, every time.

Our initial ‘Understand Your Brand Workshop’ (a 4-8 hour in-person intensive) allows us to clearly define things like brand identity, personality, aesthetic direction, target audience, competitors, and lays the groundwork for the design and development process.

Every team member touches every project we work on in some capacity - a perk of having a team of about 10 people. Plus, the design team has direct contact with the client through meetings, calls, and presentations. I feel it’s vital for the designers on a project to “sell their work” and to be present in client situations to hear things first-hand.

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How does Dropmark fit into your workflow?

Dropmark is an excellent (and super simple) way for our team to capture inspiration they see in the wild. We’re constantly inundated with beautiful, intuitive design - and Dropmark allows us to harness that inspiration and use it in mood-boarding, concepting, and inspiration throughout the projects we work on.

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What’s the most interesting thing you’ve Dropmarked recently?

We see design continuing to trend in a more straightforward and simpler direction. Less is more. Get to the point. Drive your user to do what you want them to do without obstacles. We’re always on the lookout for ways to deliver strong messages, display beautiful design, and drive users to act in a direct and impactful way. This is reflected in the kinds of things we add to Dropmark most often around here.

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See more of Proof’s work at proofbranding.com and follow them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

Manage Your Home Renovation Using Dropmark

There are so many options when it comes to home renovation. Penny tiles, white subway tiles, marble hexagon tiles, mosaic tiles, or hand-painted tiles. And that’s just tiles.

If you’re anything like me, HGTV has a lot to answer for in your home. I am obsessed with shows like Fixer Upper and Good Bones, with their designs and can-do attitude. These shows give me illusions of grandeur, despite having never knocked through a wall or built a deck.



There is inspiration everywhere online. Using our browser extension, you can save images or blog posts online without breaking your stride. If you need more color in your life head to Old Brand New to see how color and vintage finds can create a design oasis. My favorite design blog is Design*Sponge, I particularly love their home tours featuring real homes. These features feel aspirational, but still achievable by mere mortals like myself.

Another of my favorite resources is Farrow & Ball, who make beautiful paints and wallpaper. Farrow & Ball’s site explores many different ways you can use color. Their explanations on how to create the illusion of more space and how color is affected by the direction of natural light are illuminating. Established in 1930, Farrow & Ball have a wealth of knowledge to share. If you’re considering a neutral palette, the way they identify different neutral tones will save you a lot of headaches.

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If you use our iOS app, you have all your collections in your pocket. Our app can make sure you don’t find yourself wandering around Home Depot like a lost child. If you need to compare prices or colors, you can whip out your phone and snag a deal.

Renovation gets more ordered if you use Stacks, which are available to Pro or Team users. Stacks are like sub-folders within your Dropmark collection. You can have different stacks for different topics i.e., one for your guest room, another stack for the downstairs bathroom, or the kitchen. Stacks help you keep things ordered, but still centralized.

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When you save inspiration to Dropmark, you can start to see connections that you didn’t even realize were there. I when I redid our living room last year I saved a variety of furniture in a particular collection, which helped me distill the vibe I wanted to go for. By seeing everything on the screen at once, I noticed a color story that I was able to refine and keep in mind.

I also found that being able to view similar items side by side helped me to compare them and then decide on which things were worth splurging on, and where I could save money.



Not a DIY’er? Add your interior designer or even your contractor to your renovation collection. Collaborating on Dropmark cuts long email chains and you can share your inspiration instantly. See how to add collaborators to your collection. If you’re a Pro or Team user you can use comments to discuss paint colors on Dropmark in complete privacy.

I continue to save inspiration to Dropmark for future homes and rooms. I can’t currently fit a library in my small Brooklyn apartment, but a girl can dream. Whether you dream of a cabin in the woods, or a fun loft apartment, you can dream with Dropmark.

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How do you use Dropmark for your home? Let us know on Twitter and Instagram.

Our browser extension can save you time

Dropmark’s crown jewels are undoubtedly our browser and iOS apps, but our browser extension is an unsung hero.

If you’re anything like me, you have at least a few browser extensions littering your browser’s toolbar. How else could you possibly remember my passwords, or correct your grammar? Adding another extension to your line up can be a commitment, but here are three reasons that the Dropmark browser extension is going to change your workflow for the better.

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Don’t skip a beat

When you stumble upon a piece of art, blog post, or location that you know is interesting, but have no idea when it would be useful right now, you can save it to Dropmark with two clicks. Perhaps even add a few tags to the item directly in the browser extension. Tags can help you build links between items you’ve already added to Dropmark.

Dropmark is better with your stuff in it, whether that’s for you to move into other collections for future projects, or just as a personal inspiration resource whenever you need. By saving inspiration to a collection, you can always revisit your handpicked gems instead of trawling the vastness of the internet. Make it a place where you can get inspired, get focussed, and get stuff done.

Worried about storage space? Storage limits only apply to files uploaded to Dropmark, not bookmarks and web content which are unlimited. You can go as wild as you like with the browser extension.

If the website changes, your collection doesn’t have to

When it comes to bookmarked websites, so long as the website you link to is live, it’ll be viewable through Dropmark. But it’s not unusual for a blog you love to wind down, for an article to get lost, or for a killer design to become flabby. What if you want to create an archive that isn’t reliant on anyone else’s website? That’s where the Dropmark browser extension comes in.

Our browser extension allows you to take a screenshot of a whole website, from top to bottom. That way, no matter what happens, your screenshot will stay safely in your collection. See more about how you can use screenshots to create an archive on Dropmark.

Keep the receipts

Having receipts is cool, and citing your sources is relevant in academia, design, and pretty much any industry. When you add anything using to Dropmark using our browser extensions, you’ll be able to see the sources in whatever app you use for Dropmark.

By always having your sources on hand you never have to Google for the original artist or scour the internet trying to match images for the perfect location. Just one more way to make your life a little bit easier.

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What do you use our browser extension for? Let us know on Twitter and Instagram.

How Composite Co. gets things done

Composite Co. is a multidisciplinary creative studio founded by Jacob Weinzettel and Christian Dutilh in Washington DC.

Composite Co. was founded in 2014 and has been making waves ever since. Their risk-taking design aesthetic pays dividends. Together they create beautiful and functional visual identities for businesses in DC and beyond.

We chatted with Jacob Weinzettel about inspiration, Composite Co.’s process, and how they use Dropmark to get things done.

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Can you tell me a little bit about Composite Co. and how you got started?

Composite Co. is the creative studio of me, Jacob Weinzettel and my partner Christian Dutilh. We met in 2014, started seeing each other shortly after that, and starting working on a big project together about a year later. It was a pretty natural progression.

Composite began out of the desire to combine our skills, talents, and natural aesthetic proclivities. It’s also loosely based around the concept of “jugaad” the Hindi word which means to make something by piecing together what you have, to hack your current resources, which was our mantra when we were starting the studio.

We started out of our homes, and favorite coffee shops (shout out to Colony Club in DC) then graduated to desks at a WeWork, and finally got our own studio this time last year.

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How does design fit into Composite Co.’s culture?

Literally everything produced in the world is designed in one way or another (whether good or bad), so we think about it on that micro of a scale in addition to the macro view.

Design is at the core of every decision we make—from the tools we use and the things we create, the environment we build around us, to the philosophical worldview we go out into the world with.

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How does being based in DC impact your work?

Being a designer in DC means continuously fighting back against the commonly-held belief that only government bureaucrats and politicians live here, which is a misconception. So our work is driven in large part by the desire to be seen and acknowledged by a city of people that aren’t very design savvy, which is often an uphill battle.

Pushing the limits of what people are comfortable with from a design perspective has become our own political act of rebellion, which is very DC of us when you think about it. There’s always that underlying sense that we have our studio here to shake things up.

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What inspires your team?

Our team is inspired by surprise. Things and images that surprise are the most interesting to us. We’re not necessarily interested in making something conventionally pretty. Anything that challenges our current ideas about aesthetics and the state of the world is inspiring to us.

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What does your creative process look like?

Our creative process is constantly in flux, and we’re always pivoting and trying new things. Evolution is definitely another of our core values.

Generally, it starts with a massive amount of input and research—reading, writing, critical discussion, and collecting images from the far dark corners of the internet. Image output is inevitably linked to the inputs, which we don’t think is a bad thing as long as the inputs are good.

We do our best not to look at things that most people are looking at, and there’s also a critical multidisciplinary approach here as well—visual art, industrial design, interiors, architecture, photography, typography, and traditional graphic design images can all be relevant.

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How does Dropmark fit into your workflow?

Dropmark helps us collect all these inputs from an unfathomable amount of sources. Whether it’s something a previous intern Airdropped to us one time three years ago or something from a more traditional visual inspiration source like Instagram or Pinterest. It’s great to have a tool that consolidates and organizes all of our visual image research.

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What’s the most interesting thing you Dropmarked lately?

Probably this font that includes no actual typographic characters but instead is comprised entirely of plant and leaf glyphs.

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See more of Composite Co.’s work at wearecomposite.co and follow them on Twitter and Instagram.